Tuesday, 30 June 2015

Who Reviews: Blink by DJ Forrest



Blink

Written by Steven Moffat
Reviewed by DJ Forrest
Broadcast 9th June 2007.

“Don’t blink.  Blink and you’re dead!”


In all the years of Doctor Who, I didn’t think anything could outmatch the Daleks, the most formidable of foes, but then one evening in 2007, Steven Moffat created a creature that would put all fear of graveyard walking after dark, or during the day in fact, as a potential risk to any Whovian out there.  There would be no more walking past stone statues as if they were mere stone statues, there would be a level of whispering, a close scrutiny of the angel quietly watching, there would be fear gripping their very souls, and there would be lots of running!  Oh and the fear of blinking, should we come into close contact with any stone statues with the threat of our own extinction!

Yes, the Weeping Angels have stolen the top spot once reserved for those pepper pots on wheels. 

Blink is one of those episodes, much like the Absorbaloff episode (only better) that features very little of the Doctor and his companion.  They are there, somewhere, just to help the story along, but the main characters are those unconnected to the travelling Time Lord. 

Sally Sparrow and her friend Kathy Nightingale are investigating an old property in Wester Drumlins.  Sally’s a photographer and something has always drawn her to the old derelict house.  Of course she’s unaware of the angels in the building, all waiting for her, or another unsuspecting human visitor.  At first however, there seems little threat and the viewer is treated to a little tension thanks to Murray Gold’s score, and we notice something about the statues in that they move positions. 
In a wallpapered room Sally spots a tear in the paper and a message underneath which tells her to duck and gives her a stark warning of what’s to come.  Although she’s unsure at first, when she brings her friend Nightingale with her to look around, they hear a knock at the door.  While her friend hides in the back room, Sally answers the door to a young man with a letter for her, to be given at that exact time. 

What we see unfolding is her Kathy’s letter to Sally, explaining what happened and who the guy is who knocks on the door.  Unbeknownst to Nightingale, as both had taken their eyes off the statue out in the garden; she has been transported back in time to live out her days in the past.  It’s a little hard to take on board at first, and it shows the magnitude of these creatures, far more dangerous than that of the Dalek, who, yes, can kill you with its blaster, but that’s instant.  The Weeping Angels feed off your time energy, and all your happy moments in your life. 
A bit like dementors, but slightly better looking, until they bare their teeth of course!

The Doctor and Martha are trapped in 1969 where another sad chappie is sent, that being the policeman who happens upon the TARDIS in the cop car park.  One blink and puff he’s gone. 

The Doctor and Martha however have found a way of contacting Sally and Kathy’s brother Larry, through a series of Easter egg portions in 17 DVD’s which are in Sally’s collection at home and are finally pieced together in script format enabling Sally to ask all the right questions at the right time. 

It’s an ingenious idea and well thought out, and despite the sad lack of the Doctor in proper form, this is still an awesome episode which still freaks me out even today.  This was our first introduction of the Weeping Angels, and hopefully not our last.  We’ve seen them beyond this with the 11th incarnation and the sad farewell of Amy and Rory Williams – and boy was that a heartbreaking episode.

I’d like to think that we’d see more of them with the 12th and beyond.

There was some talk that the two people standing behind Rassilon in ‘The End of Time’ were the early form of the Weeping Angels.  Now I’m not sure if this is true, or it’s another of those famous RTD red herrings, but it would be interesting to find out all the same.

So, do you still think that your garden statue is just a garden statue; do you dare take your eyes off it for just a second?






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